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MACA

Main Ingredients: Polysaccharides

GEOGRAPHICAL SPREAD

Maca is a cultivating plant of the genus Lepidium, which belongs to the huge economic family of Brassicaceae, also known as the cabbage family. This genus originates from the Mediterranean region, while Maca is the only species of genus domesticated in the United States (Hermann & Heller, 1997).

HISTORICAL FEATURES

Plant uses have been mentioned since 1961 by Chacon as a fertility enhancer, and in 2006 Locher reported cases according to which farmers in the Pasco area (WA, USA) received the plant to increase physical strength and strength at work. In 1948, in the city of La Oroya, where miners lived, it was said that the consumption of Maca was increased due to the number of visitors in a nearby brothel (Hermann & Bernet, 2009).

PHARMACEUTICAL USE

According to experimental evidence, Maca can increase stamina to processes involving physical fatigue and exercise (Tang, et al., 2017). The increase in sexual desire caused by Maca has not yet been associated with a biomarker such as testosterone and estradiol levels, and does not appear to affect an individual's anxiety levels or depression.

PHYTOCHEMICAL COMPOSITION

The main ingredients of Maca are polysaccharides, which can be used effectively to increase immunity, antioxidant protection and anti-fatigue action. Maca crude polysaccharides are considered to be its main bioactive ingredients and constitute at least 10% of the dried feedstock.

ARTICLE SOURCE
  • Gonzales, G., Cordova, A., Chung, A., Villena, A., Gonez, C., & Castillo, S. (2002). Effect of Lepidium meyenii (MACA) on sexual desire and its absent relationship with serum testosterone levels in adult healthy men. ANDROLOGIA, 367-372.
  • Hermann, M., & Bernet, T. (2009). The transition of maca from neglectto marketprominence. Agricultural Biodiversity and Livelihoods Discussion Papers.
  • Hermann, Μ., & Heller, J. (1997). Andean roots and tubers: Ahipa, arracacha, maca and yacon. Promoting the conservation and use of underutilized and neglected.